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° on Saturday in Mosman

Warringah Votes! Meet Your Federal Election Candidates

Australia goes to the polls on Saturday May 18 to elect our Federal representatives. In our Mosman Living Facebook group we asked our 20,000+ members what questions they would like to ask their candidates. Every candidate running in our local electorate of Warringah received the same questions and the same opportunity to respond.

Here are their responses (in alphabetical order by candidate surname)…

Tony Abbott: Liberal

Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in the electorate that you love.

Margie and I have been living in Warringah since 1994. It’s where our kids grew up and it’s where we have built a life. It’s where Margie coached netball teams, and ran Girl Guides groups. It’s where I have served in the Rural Fire Brigade, and have done surf patrol. It’s where my annual pollie pedal bike ride has raised money for Bear Cottage, Streetwork, the Pioneer Clubhouse, and the Northern Beaches Women’s Shelter to name just a few of the charities that have been supported.

I can’t think of a better area in which to live and grow. For me the walk with the kids from our place in Forestville down the Carroll Creek track to Roseville Bridge was always pretty special. Then there’s North Head where the Warringah Australia Remembers Team built the Defence of Sydney Monument. And who could go past the beach between Queenscliff and North Steyne, where I love to drop in on my constituents!

Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our community?

I’m standing because I am determined to ensure the Northern Beaches Tunnel finally gets built and only the Liberal Party is 120% in favour of it. I’m also standing because the people of Warringah can have no better and more effective MP than a former Prime Minister with the megaphone to use on their behalf that only long experience in high office can bring.

What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?

Leadership is the ability to make a decision and get things done. I’ve demonstrated as a local member, as a minister, and as a party leader and Prime Minister that I can make a difference. There aren’t too many people, for instance, who have led the Liberal Party from opposition into government in Canberra

If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?

I’ve always had regular meet the member public meetings and I am regularly surveying my constituents to ensure that they know where I stand and I know where they stand.

Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):
–          The environment and climate change
–          Housing affordability
–          Wage stagnation and tax cuts
–          The threat of terrorism
–          Health funding
–          Education funding

The most important issue is not actually mentioned. That’s cost of living. The government’s job is to do whatever it can to keep cost of living down. Certainly, we should not face unnecessary policy-induced rises in our cost of living and that’s the worry with some of the proposals to “do more on climate change”.

Climate change  is an important issue, but it’s not the only one, and we need to get the balance right between reducing emissions and keeping our economy strong.

Housing affordability is important and, again, a strong economy is at the heart of maximising people’s chances of buying their own home.

Tax cuts are the best way to simulate the economy and drive economic growth – but they have to be responsible and that’s why good budget management is important too.

The threat of terrorism is greater now than at any time in our history and we need to combat Islamist extremism both at home and abroad.

Health funding under the Coalition has increased every year, as it should. When I was Health Minister, I often declared that the Howard Government was “the best friend Medicare ever had” and Coalition governments have always been the best to handle health because they’ve kept the  strong economy needed to pay for it.

Likewise with education funding, we need a strong economy to ensure that it’s sustainable. Ample funding is important for schools and universities but it’s not the only thing. The best possible teachers, principal autonomy, parental involvement and rigorous academic standards are very important too.

Likewise, with the NDIS and hospital and aged care funding, a strong economy is at the heart of sustainable increased funding.

There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?

Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?  

Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?

What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community levels for common diseases such a measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?

What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

As you know, I am the only candidate in this election who is 120% in favour of the Northern Beaches Tunnel so I support it without qualification. It must go ahead because without it, the traffic gridlock will just get worse by the month.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in the 
a) short term
b) medium term
c) long term?

 The biggest issues facing the people of Warringah are traffic gridlock and overdevelopment. But Warringah people are Australian citizens, as well as locals, and, as citizens, the big issue for us is keeping the economy strong and our country safe. This is where a returned Liberal government is by far our best option.

Heather Barnes: Animal Justice Party

No answers received as yet.

Jason Blaiklock: Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)

No answers received as yet.

Brian Clare: Fraser Anning’s Conservative National Party

Photo credit: Daily Telegraph
Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in the electorate that you love.
Connection to Warringah, at least 3 places: Zoo, Balmoral, Middle Head  now National Park where i did my Reserve Army service in the 1960’s, plus Clifton Gardens when there was a hotel there,  and of course the Beuna Vista hotel at Mosman Junction, the Artillery School at North Head , and the now National Park of North Head, then Manly  and the Ferry, Curl Curl, Freshwater etc.
Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our community?
Why a Candidate. To bring up the Issues and Concerns  not listened to by the Parliament. see the proposal to Insert by Referendum  CIR (Citizens Initiate Referenda) for the Voters to Take Back Control over the political class.
What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?
Leadership & Example  I would set up a regular meet  the People conference at a public meeting in town hall  etc.
If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?
How to canvass opinions I would set up a Facebook  or WE WE page and a website page.
Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):
Assignment by level of Importance   (3) Environment & Climate change.
                                                           (1) Housing Affordability.
                                                           (6) Wage stagnation & tax cuts.
                                                           (5 )Threat of Terrorism – note i did my military at Middle Head in Army Intelligence Security.
                                                           (3) Health Funding.
                                                           (4) Education funding.
There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?
Females as elected  reps imbalance Select on merit
Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?  
NDIS, Hospital and AGED Care funding most important for sufficient funding.
Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?
Nuclear Power  not at this stage for military and civil projects, eventually for Navy submarines.see my policy sheet attached to  produce potable water and electricity generation plants on the coasts using in the case of electricity salt water readily available as the product to drive the turbines, Thus no more need in the long term to burn coal. To save on pollution , cap the chimney stacks  by air conditioning and filtering and insulate other industrial premises producing heat and fumes to the atmosphere resulting in global warming,
What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community levels for common diseases such a measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?
Lift vaccination rates Requires stringent enforcement, e.g. hold back Child support until met.
What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?
West Papua controlled by Indonesia. Absolutely disgusting ,how the Indonesian army/Police are mistreating the Indigenous natives mostly of Melanesian stock, killing and confiscation of property and burning houses  to make the point about natives standing up for their inalienable rights. Australia should send in Troops to guard these natives from the brutality regularly shown.

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

Western Harbour Tunnel & Beaches link. It seems it will go ahead.  There should be provision to widen the tunnel to accommodate trams/light rail to  run along the beaches to just past Avalon , and also run the trams from Manly wharf to link up at Brookvale  plus a route towards Curl Curl, all aimed at keeping motor vehicles off the road.
Alternative proposal until Tunnel is built. Build a 4 lane bridge  with the Tram option from Seaforth  to Cammeray to join up with the Freeway ,  and keep through traffic off Military Road through Mosman,Cremorne, Neutral Bay.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in the 

a) short term, b) medium term, c) long term

Issues dealing with the large  volume of traffic through Seaforth  , Mosman, Cremorne , Neutral  Bay, consider closing down lanes  traffic for  going  west /south to the Harbour bridge  to one lane in the morning peak hour and reversing that in the afternoon peak going home from the city via Harbour bridge.

Kristyn Glanville: The Greens

Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in the electorate that you love.

 I live in Freshwater with my partner, and have lived on the Northern Beaches since childhood. I went to high school at St Lukes in Dee Why. Being from Freshwater, can’t go past Freshwater Beach, riding on the Manly Ferry to work in the city and Mrs Jones the Baker as I have a bit of a sweet tooth

Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our community?

 I am running because I believe politics needs to be done differently. Our current government is not fit for purpose when it comes to responding climate change, as it is clear their anti-science policy is driven by political donations and lobbyists from the coal industry – but not in the best interests of everyone else. I’ve done pro bono work for asylum seekers brought off Nauru and it’s struck me that our politicians really lack empathy for the consequences of their policy decisions. These are not just for refugees, but for people on Newstart looking for work, elderly people struggling with inadequate pensions, disabled people unable to afford the care they need, and young people struggling to buy their first home alongside the rising costs of living and housing.

The core of my belief and my policies is the need to treat our planet and people with compassion. As an environment and planning lawyer, my career has been devoted to advising businesses, governments and individuals on issues like building sustainable cities, renewable energy and waste. I’m proud to have worked on a number of solar and wind energy projects . I can see the huge opportunities of a renewable economy for Warringah. We have a budding solar industry locally in Manly, and individuals and small businesses alike can join in the renewable revolution through our plan to make investing in solar panels or community solar projects easier, and create over 55,000 clean energy jobs in NSW.

What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?

Leadership is having a positive, long term, vision for Warringah and Australia beyond just the next electoral cycle and working collaboratively without ego. Unfortunately, these qualities are often lacking in Canberra.

I promise to listen to constituents, be present in our community, be active in resolving local issues and fighting for local services, and be transparent about what the work I do. This includes real-time disclosure of donations, maintaining a publicly accessible diary of any meetings with interest groups, and regularly updating the community on the work that I do.

If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?

A healthy democracy can only come from an informed citizenry and I want to be a part of that. First, I would commit to holding regular ‘town halls’ where constituents can meet with me and other community members to discuss current affairs. In addition, I would facilitate collecting community views via platforms like surveys and newsletters. Lastly, my door will always be open to members of the community suggesting their ideas for how I can engage with them. I want to trial new ways to directly engage the public in decision making, including citizen juries, and for community petitions to trigger a requirement for parliament to debate a topic.

Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):

–          The environment and climate change (1)

–          Housing affordability (3)

–          Wage stagnation (2)

 –          Tax cuts (7)

–          The threat of terrorism (6)

–          Health funding (5)

–          Education funding (4)

There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?

 In 2019, that statistic is a shocker. We need a Parliament which looks as diverse as the people on our streets. This means not just gender equality, but also diversity of background; Aboriginal people, people of different ages, and a range of professional/vocational backgrounds. For too long, politics has excluded the voices and interests of everyone in our community, but if we listen to all perspectives, we can not only learn from each other but find the best answers to the challenges we all individually and collectively face.

The Greens support:

  • Removing the barriers which exclude or discourage women from running for office, including tackling bullying political culture where it exists.
  • The maintenance of the federal Office for Women, including its position as part of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet supported by a separate Minister or Parliamentary Secretary.
  • To actively promote women to stand as candidates for election. The Greens actively promote and support women in our party, and 50% of our Federal party room is female.

Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?  

I’ve worked on the Northern Beaches as a respite carer for children with disabilities. My family members continue to work locally in this sector, and some of my closest friends rely on NDIS services. It is clear that while the NDIS is a step in the right direction, it is not being implemented in a people-oriented way. The Greens would overhaul NDIS to ensure its staff and processes put people first, and there is the funding in place to ensure all members of our community can access the community and live a good life.

It has been disappointing to see our local hospital, Northern Beaches Hospital, is a privately operated facility. We have lost two great community assets (Mona Vale and Manly Hospitals) and these have been replaced by a single, for-profit, hospital where the profits from treating sick people in our community will soon be offshored to the Cayman Islands. Some of my family have been patients at the NBH and despite the efforts of the people working there, the level of care and amount of services available needs to improve. Unfortunately, NBH does not currently meet the needs of our aging population and many young families.

The Greens are calling for this hospital to be returned to public hands to remove the profit motive to cut corners and ensure the community is put first. We would also increase funding of our public hospitals to ensure that all members of our community can access the care they need – and people don’t need to fork out for private health insurance in order to have adequate medical care. This includes our plan to put dental care on Medicare through a phase in of services.

It was quite shocking to see media reports concerning the abusive treatment of our elders at a local nursing home. The Greens wound ensure older Australians have safe, affordable aged care, and are able to choose whether to stay at home or to move to residential care. We will also improve quality of care through improved staffing ratios and level of care, and providing better training and pay to attract and retain quality staff.

Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?

On the currently available technology, nuclear power is not an ideal solution for our clean electricity generation needs.

  • As an environment and planning lawyer, I regularly deal with issues like waste. Nuclear power generates radioactive waste which takes anywhere from 200 – 10,000 years to decay, which is a long-term burden placed on future generations for the short term benefit of the current generation.
  • The development timeframe for a single nuclear power plant is at least 8 years – whereas individual large scale solar projects can come online in 3 years, and wind farms online in 5 years. Other forms of clean energy can therefore be implemented more quickly.
  • Nuclear energy requires a high level of regulatory oversight, and ongoing funding devoted to monitoring and maintaining facilities. This would commit future governments to this burden, beyond the next election cycle and for the lifespan of the facility.

We should be pursuing a circular economy, where we have an ‘exit strategy’ away from mining. Coal and nuclear energy will require ongoing mining into the future for more fuel – whereas through recycling schemes we can eventually stop mining for the components required for alternatives like wind turbines and solar panels.

What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community levels for common diseases such a measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?

We would support evidence based policies being implemented to raise vaccination rates, guided by recommendations from the medical profession. The Greens have supported ‘no jab no pay’ policies in the past, to regularly remind families of the importance of vaccination.

We also recognise that in very rare circumstances, some individuals have an adverse reaction, in which case we want to explore creating a ‘no fault’ compensation scheme to deal with those rare situations.

What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?

The Australian Greens join calls from around the world for the right of the West Papuan people to determine their own political future. We have previously condemned the human rights violations faced by West Papuan people, and called for an internationally supervised vote on self-determination in the strongest terms.

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

Like many in our area, I catch a bus to work everyday. The Greens agree that improved transport infrastructure is desperately needed in the Northern Beaches, and while elected politicians have been talking about fixing this for over 30 years, neither of the parties have ever fixed the problem. Based on my experience as an environment and planning lawyer, I have strong environmental and economic concerns about the proposed Northern Beaches Tunnel:

  • First and foremost, there is no business case to support building it, and no analysis has ever been done to compare the project against alternatives like building a train line or light rail instead. If any company was spending $9bn on a project, their shareholders would expect more due diligence than has been done for the NBT.
  • The most similar tunnel project, WestConnex, was recently privatised to a Liberal Party donor for less than half of the build cost. As such, it is questionable whether tunnels are a wise or democratic investment of public money.
  • Many in the community are concerned about the health and environmental impact of pollution from the unfiltered stacks concentrated near schools, and the loss of green space like Balgowlah Golf Club and native vegetation along the Wakehurst Parkway.
  • A 2-3 lane tunnel will not adequately service our area when the NSW Government plans thousands of new homes on the Northern Beaches. I have asked RMS for the modelling used to project the travel times and when they expect the tunnel will be at capacity. They never responded to my email.

Given the large cost and serious impacts on our community associated with the Tunnel, I consider the government has a duty to make sure any transport infrastructure project is based on good evidence and consultation with the community.

If I was elected to the Federal Parliament, I would:

  • Talk to the NSW Government to carry out the due diligence which ought to have been done in the first place and identify the best transport option for the long term needs of our community – and to properly consult the community about the pros, cons, and value for money of the different options.
  • Work for Federal funding towards implementing a public transport solution, which has spare capacity to service the long term needs of the community.
  • Not commit any additional funding towards the tunnel unless the NSW Government can substantiate that the proposed tunnel:
    • represents good value for money and is the best long term transport solution for our area,
    • has been amended to deal with concerns about environmental and social impacts raised by the community, and
    • will have dedicated public transport.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in the 

a) short term

  • Bring Northern Beaches Hospital back into public hands.
  • A moratorium on the Northern Beaches Tunnel, based on recommendations from transport experts that this option is not likely to provide a long term reduction in travel times or congestion.
  • Addressing wage stagnation by ensuring a living wage for all workers. Raising Newstart and aged care funding to address immediate cost of living pressure for people between work and elderly Australians who are unable to afford the care they need.
  • Work with the Northern Beaches Council and their transport strategy to increase bus and ferry services, and building active transport infrastructure.
  • Ban unnecessary single use plastics.

b) medium term

  • Implement a phased transition from fossil fuels to clean energy across all levels of government. Investing to ensure that all households and businesses can own, and benefit from, renewable energy generation and storage – including supporting Manly’s solar industry. Work with workers currently employed in the fossil fuels industry to transition to other sectors so no one is left behind.
  • Ensure our public schools are fully funded, so all families can access to the best education for their children, and remove that pressure to spend money on private education.
  • Ensure our local public hospitals are fully funded, so all families can access to the healthcare they need. We need to stop the current race to the bottom on privatisation, which delivers a worse service at a higher cost.
  • Investigate a long term public transport solution that works for the long term needs of the community, including the viability of different public transport options like putting a tram in the Northern Beaches tunnel.
  • Overhaul our environmental laws and establish a Federal EPA to ensure that our natural environment is protected and that development is independently and properly assessed and overseen.
  • Address making it easier for young people to buy their first home, and build more social and community housing to ensure that people in our area who are homeless or escaping domestic violence have a safe place to live.

c) long term?

  • Implement a plan for the transition away from coal and make Australia a renewable energy exporting superpower through domestic production of hydrogen fuel.
  • Plan for a circular economy, where we fully recycle, reuse, and repair all products. Aim for zero waste in landfill. Protect our environment from unsustainable land clearing and mining.
  • Protect our food bowl for the long term by ensuring our agricultural practices and water usage are sustainable into the future. Ensure our foreign investment review processes for agricultural land are rigorous, including ensuring environmental considerations are included before allowing sale of Australian assets to foreign companies or individuals.

Dean Harris: Labor

Photo credit: Australian Labor Party website

Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in
the electorate that you love.

I live in Mosman and have done so for the last 12 years. I love Cremorne Point as I live quite close to it. I traverse regularly as I jog around the Point for exercise or as I commute to my office in the city by ferry. The views on either side of the point are stunning.

I love Balmoral beach. It is one of the most beautiful places on the harbour. I paddle a
kayak for exercise and enjoyment and will often drop-in at Balmoral before paddling over to Manly or around the Spit and up toward Roseville. I love the Hayden Orpheum Theatre. The Art-deco styling of the cinema, the wonderful array of movies and other events such as live comedy and music make it an important cultural treasure in our community.

Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our
community?

As fortunate as we are to live in one of the most beautiful parts of Australia, our country and our community are facing unprecedented challenges – challenges that will forever affect who we are, how we live, and the environment we call home. The current government has failed to step up and address these challenges. They have ignored the needs of young people, older people and families to get a fair go and have ignored the need for action on climate change and failed to protect our environment.

We’re suffering a political landscape that’s become far too divided and personal – and bereft of the kind of decency, debate and co-operation that’s required to move us forward. I’m running because I believe we can do better. I believe we owe it to ourselves to try. And I know that if we work together, we’ll succeed.

What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a
positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?

I run my own business and have led teams and organisations for the last 20 years. I am a
collaborative leader by nature. I seek to unite people through identifying a shared purpose, motivating them through shared rewards, empowering people to take responsibility for and a stake in what they are doing and lastly to enable and facilitate solutions when issues arise of challenges are inevitably encountered.

I intend to apply my leadership style to the role of representing Warringah, should I be
elected and will work to consult, unite, empower, and facilitate solutions with and on behalf of our community.

If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?

I commit to regular town-hall meetings across the electorate so people can come together
and discuss with me the things of greatest concern to them. I have an open-door policy at work and would have the same as the member for Warringah so that everyone is welcome to meet with me in person when I’m not in Canberra. Lastly, as I have done with this campaign, I will personally respond to any mail or email correspondence people may wish to have with me.

Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to
Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):

1 – The environment and climate change
5 – Housing affordability
2 – Wage stagnation and tax cuts
6 – The threat of terrorism
4 – Health funding
3 – Education funding

There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives
since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?

Today, 48% of all Labor MPs are women and we have a target to have 50% representation
following this election. I’m proud to be a member and a candidate of a party that has
incredibly talented women leading it.

Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?

The current government have underfunded the NDIS by $1.6 billion dollars, creating a
waiting list of over 70,000 people who are yet to be assessed for and NDIS plan. Labor vows to restore that funding, ensure the NDIA have sufficient staff to process and manage
assessments. Boosting investment in healthcare is a key plank of our policy platform. We commit to restore the funding of public hospitals to a 50-50 contribution with State and Territory governments, something the Coalition has failed to do. We have also pledged to invest to shorten waiting lists for elective surgery, cover the cost of cancer diagnosis and treatment under Medicare and cap private health insurance premium increases to 2% for the first two years of government.

We also pledge to restore funding to aged care, clearing the backlog of the 120,000 elderly
Australians waiting for a Home Care package and providing free dental treatment for 3
million pensioners.

Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?

No it is not. The reason why it is not a consideration is that we have an abundance of clean, cheap renewable energy in Australia that is much cheaper to harness and produce than nuclear energy or coal-fired power. Nuclear power stations are incredibly expensive to build, take a very, very long time to construct, produce radioactive waste that is expensive to dispose of and carry with them environmental and health risks that renewables do not.

What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community
levels for common diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?

I am concerned about the increasing anti-vaccination trend that is emerging in society. I
would prefer we tackle this through better community education and information. If that is unsuccessful, then other measures that strongly encourage people to comply and vaccinate their children should be considered.

What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?

I believe we should ensure the human rights of the people of West Papua are protected. We should make strong diplomatic representation to the Indonesian government to allow NGO’s to have access to provide assistance to the people of West Papua.

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

While I believe we need urgent solutions to our traffic congestion problems, I am against the currently proposed tunnel. The reason I do not support it are:
● The most sustainable and efficient way of reducing traffic congestion is encouraging
people to use alternative modes of transport than their car. A motorway does the
opposite, by encouraging more people to use their car for trips.
● The tunnel makes no economic sense. It is a massive $8-$14 billion-dollar
investment. An estimate of the ROI on the project by a leading economist suggests
taxpayers would lose 32 cents for every dollar of public money spent on the project.
● There are better, cheaper, cleaner and more efficient solutions that could be
delivered sooner such as expanding the B-line bus service and the introduction of a
new rapid transit bus service from Dee Why to Chatswood.
● We should increase park and ride options and on-demand small bus services for bus
and ferry services allowing people to more easily connect to public transport
● We should also optimise the existing road infrastructure better by removing traffic
lights and replacing them with pedestrian over or underpasses of main roads like
Pittwater, Warringah and Military Roads.
● In the medium term, we need better planning for active transport such as allowing
more people to use bicycles, scooters and walking to make trips in the community
● In the long-term, we should explore the feasibility of light and heavy rail options
between the city, Chatswood, Brookvale and Dee Why.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in
the 
a) short term
b) medium term
c) long term?

My main concerns for the area are that, despite our beautiful native bushland, beaches and marine environments, there is more that needs to be done to ensure these precious parts of our environment are preserved for future generations, including taking action to address climate change and stop pollution of our local waterways.

Housing affordability is a big issue for people in our community. Not one suburb in
Warringah is affordable top rent or buy for people on the average weekly income. We need more affordable housing so young people don’t have to move out of the area when they leave home and essential service workers in our community can live where they work.

Reducing traffic congestion is a concern for many people. The only way to solve this is to
provide more, clean, reliable and affordable public transport options, more safe cycleways
and walkable urban environments so people can choose to leave the car at home. Providing a high-quality education for all children in our community is essential. At the
moment our public schools need better funding as I’ve spoken with teachers who are
spending their own wages on buying much-needed resources for their classrooms. Labor
will deliver $14.9 million in additional funding to public schools in Warringah over three years from 2020 to support additional teachers, materials and resources. This will ensure our local schools reach the minimum school resource standard to deliver a high-quality education.

Labor will also provide universal access to early childhood education for three and four-year-olds. Research has shown that early childhood education has a significant influence on educational outcomes later in life. That’s great news for the over 9,000 children in our electorate aged under 5 years who, under Labor, will receive up to 15 hours of early
childhood education a week.

Susan Moylan-Coombs: Independent

Image credit: sbs.com.au

Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in the electorate that you love.

I have been living in the Warringah electorate for over 50 years. This is Gai-mariagal land, it is now my “spirit country”.  I have raised my family here and as a saltwater person, I love the connection to our coastline and love being in the saltwater.

Three of the places that I love are:

  1. Being at home with family in Killarney Heights
  2. North Head, Car-rang gel
  3. Curl Curl Beach

Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our community?

I have lived in the electorate for over 50 years and I have contributed to the fabric of our community both voluntarily and professionally for over 25 years in roles including and not limited to those below. I am standing because I know what I bring to the community and a desire to create a better place for us all to live.

Voluntary Service to the Community: (past 25 years)

  • Sydney Harbour Federation Trust Community Advisory Committee member; current
  • Sydney Harbour Federation Trust Reconciliation Action Plan Committee member; current
  • Northern Sydney Local Health District Community Advisory Committee member
  • Northern Sydney Local Health District Aboriginal Committee member; current
  • Guringai Local Aboriginal Education Consultative Committee community member; current
  • Guringai Festival now Gai-mariagal Festival, Creator and Festival Committee Chair (2001-2018); current
  • Manly Council, Chair Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Committee Chair
  • Warringah Council – Cultural Advisor
  • Community Care Northern Beaches, Aboriginal Advisory Committee Member, Indigenous Project
  • Northern Sydney Institute of TAFE, Aboriginal Advisory, Gamarada Unit

 

Professional Service to the Community:

  • Caber-ra Nanga Community Wellbeing Day, 2018 & 2019 Festival Co-Ordinator; current
  • Caber-ra Nanga Project, Partnership Project with Relationships Australia and Funded by the Sydney North Primary Health District, Cultural Governance ; current
  • Community Care Northern Beaches, Partners In Recovery, Wellness Consultant
  • Northern Sydney Aboriginal Social Plan, Manly Community Centre, Project Officer
  • Northern Sydney Institute TAFE, Aboriginal Co-Ordinator
  • Northern Sydney Local Health District, produced resources:
    • Northern Sydney Local Health District Australia’s First Peoples Female Life Cycle Health and Wellbeing Plan
    • “Wiyanga” Birthing on Country, A gift to all women giving birth on Gai-mariagal Country.
  • Senior Officer Group, Families First/Aboriginal Child Youth Family Strategy
  • Department of Education & Training, Northern Sydney Education Network Committee
  • Founding Board Member ANZPTSD Fearless (National)
  • Board Member NSW Indigenous Chamber of Commerce 2017 – current

I continue to be of service to the community, and will continue to be of service to the community regardless of the outcome. I think we need to look at what candidates have done prior to nominating to see the authenticity of what they bring.

What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?

 Leadership is the ability to understand people and influence them, to activate social empowerment with the aim of achieving common goals. As seen above with my list of activities, voluntary and professionally being of service to the community, I have influenced many sectors and created many opportunities to bring people and communities together to create a more sustainable future.  My goal has been for decade to bring about a healing that this electorate, this region, and this nation so desperately needs. Is anyone listening?

First Nation’s philosophies are all about connection and belonging.  We know where we belong. Our way is about the collectivism not individualism.  It is about take what you need not what you greed. It is about sharing so everyone can prosper.  It is about doing things that don’t disrupt the natural laws of balance. What you do today will have consequences for our future generations.  So make sure you are living a sustainable life and not one that depletes our natural resources. We need to be more future focussed.

If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?

I don’t think I will be going to Canberra.  The press need to decolonise their mindsets and recognise that this nation is a multicultural nation.  What we have seen in the media reporting of the Warringah electorate by mainstream press has been a “whitewash”.  No matter how much I would like to project some colour into the electorate, I have not been invite to key events so I focus on delivering my message to those people who live in the electorate that want to listen.

I have always been involved in community consultations when collaborating to create programs in the region.  It’s in the collaboration that you find the riches and diversity that truly represents the people living locally. The Gai-mariagal Festival, a celebration of First Nations culture and heritage in the Northern Sydney region is 19 years old.  It is a sad state of affairs when the mainstream doesn’t report on the activities of a festival that has been created to bring healing and bring communities together to create more meaningful dialogue and understanding.

Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):

1         The environment and climate change

2          Housing affordability

3          Wage stagnation and tax cuts

6          The threat of terrorism

4          Health funding

5          Education funding

There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?

I’m a woman and from my cultural perspective women’s representation has always been valued and we always had a seat at council.  It has only been since the colonial system was dumped here that women have been marginalised. The Lore of this land was always inclusive.

Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?  

In a previous professional role, I was employed by Community Care Northern Beaches, who delivered aged care services, disability services as well as services to people with lived experience of Mental illnesses. I have been asked many questions about homeliness, mental health, aged care, youth at risk and having worked in the human services sector for a period of time I am fully supportive of making the system better in its service delivery for better outcome for individuals and their families We called it person centre care, what ever support or care people needed we worked with individuals to guide and deliver the support in anyway necessary.

I believe that we need to:

  1. Increased funding for home care so that all Australians waiting for care receive it when they are assessed as needing it, at the right level to match their needs.
  2. A consistent, equitable and flexible funding model that supports older Australians to improve their health and wellbeing, regardless of whether care is provided in a home, community or residential care setting. 
  3. Ensuring vulnerable older Australians (for example those living in rural or remote locations, older Australians with a disability, those for whom English is a second or subsequent language and those who may have diverse life experiences or characteristics) achieve the same standard of outcomes as other Australians, including through the provision of appropriate subsidies.

4.     Simplifying the aged care system so it is easier for people to understand and access and provide more help to people who need assistance to navigate the system.

  1. Government policies and funding that deliver more staff and an appropriate skill mix that delivers quality outcomes for older Australians
  2. Improved and ongoing training appropriate to the skills staff need to fulfil their job.

7.     Better investment in staff with the right values to retain a quality workforce.

  1. In-reach health services so that aged care residents have access to health services such as specialist care and mental health services, allied health, general practitioner and dental health services.

I believe that older people deserve access to the highest quality of care when they need and where they need it, regardless of who they are, where they live or their circumstances. This means ensuring we create the right jobs and numbers of staff in aged care. Prioritise are increased funding and workforce.

Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?

No

What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community levels for common diseases such a measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?

There are multiple schools of thought about vaccinations and the claimed benefits or harms.  I would be advocating for the truth to be presented to people and full disclosure by the big pharmaceutical companies as to what the ingredients of the vaccines are, so people can make better-informed choices about vaccinating their children. Previously governments and the Tobacco industry claimed smoking was safe.

What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?

Some would like to believe that Australian’s are good neighbours.  In my opinion we’re not. The continent that we call Australia is the home to the oldest living culture on the planet and “Australian’s” aren’t very good neighbours to people living locally in our communities on this continent.

Charity begins at home.  Whilst we can think globally we need to act locally first.  Australia’s track record of being actively vocal about human rights issues international smacks of hypocrisy.

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

Conversations about the tunnel have been a long running narrative in this region since I was at high school. Whatever the decision is, I would want it to view through the lens of the Triple Bottom Line, what impact will it have on people, and the environment first, after that we can consider its ability to make profit.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in the:

a) short term

Recognition it is an Environmental Emergency and there is a need for people to change their lifestyle and behaviour to save the planet for future generations. Understand First Nations knowledge, globally Indigenous knowledge with western science is the key to a sustainable future. Wealth should not be measured merely by the accumulation of money. Growing up our young people strong to enable them to do a better job that adults have done. Time is life, time is not money

b) medium term

Recognition it is an Environmental Emergency and there is a need for people to change their lifestyle and behaviour to save the planet for future generations.

c) long term?

Recognition it is an Environmental Emergency and there is a need for people to change their lifestyle and behaviour to save the planet for future generations. Be of service for a greater good to protect collective future

 

Emanuele Paletto: Sustainable Australia

 

Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in the electorate that you love.

  • I have grown up in the electorate almost all my life, and particularly in my formative years.  My family moved to Manly in the early 1970’s.  I attended manly nippers for years and went to the local school.  I played rugby for Mosman colts in my younger days;
  • My children now attend local schools as I once did and we are entrenched in the local community.  I work locally with my fledgling cleaning business;
  • My favourite 3 places are Little Manly Point Park – quiet and half faces the national park, North Head – majestic views and makes me feel small although don’t visit often enough, and, the Manly to Spit bush track.

Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our community?

  • I am standing to bring Sustainable Australia’s greater public awareness, and, its policies to people’s attention;
  • I bring to our community my strong values of combining environmental protection with economic benefits.  I have the passion and ability to fight for these given my knowledge and experience.

What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?

  • Leadership for me is leading – yes, by example – and inspiring others to work and live towards a vision of the future that they inspire others to also believe in;
  • It in the miraculous event that I was elected to parliament, I would certainly do my utmost for my 100,000 citizens.

If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?

  • By meeting with and canvassing various community, business and interest groups, such as your organisation;
  • I would also look to catch individuals who are not part of a group.  By meeting with such individuals, one can garner important information people are passionate about.

Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):

  1. The environment and climate change

2B.            Housing affordability

  1. Wage stagnation and tax cuts
  2. The threat of terrorism

2A.           Health funding

  1. Education funding

There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?

  • Meet with interest groups to learn more on how to and actually act to help and contribute to balancing the numbers;
  • Appoint women to leadership positions in our own party and my office etc.  Encouraging women to apply for positions and supporting them is key.
  • I have an ambitious eight year old daughter and I know she deserves the same opportunities to bring positive change in the world as my son.  I would certainly work for this.

Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?  

  • In my view, NDIS is an excellent system empowering individuals in our community who may need it the most;
  • I would look to help strengthen accountability of NDIS service providers and its long term financial viability.

Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?

  • Not when renewable technologies are far superior in terms of safety, total cost and waste management
  • I have experience in dealing with renewable technologies in my recent work, including in localised hydrogen power and know that there is far greater potential offered in renewable energies, starting in the immediate term.

What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community levels for common diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?

  • I would support measures to incentivise parents to vaccinate, in order to protect children who have vaccinated.  I have vaccinated my own children.
  • While I believe parents are entitled to their opinion about not vaccinating, they are placing their and others’ children’s lives and future life quality at grave risk; and, I understand chances of an adverse reaction are extremely low;
  • I personally know someone – a senior professional – who has been severely affected since contracting polio in his youth.  My paternal grandfather died very painfully, from tetanus.

What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?

  • Peace keeping is important for stability and prosperity in our region into the future. De-escalating conflict should be the priority.

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

  • Whilst it looks to be inevitable, we are opposed to the WH Tunnel and Beaches Link; A public transport link would be a much better option.
  • More and better public transport solutions, including greater private provider solutions to alleviate financial pressure and increase choice;
  • Support for faster take up of electric and autonomous personal vehicles, of course powered from renewables;
  • Lowering immigration to longer term average volume, to lessen pressures from local state and national population growth.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in the 
a) short term

Housing affordability and environment.  Unfortunately Manly Warringah is slated for a doubling of its population in the next 100 years.  With population growth, these problems will remain for the medium and particularly for the environment, into the long term.  There will be great pressure on Mosman to also experience the “population boom”.

b) medium term

Quality of local services.  It has been proven that infrastructure costs increase disproportionately with an increase in population.  Local and connecting infrastructure and services’ costs will continue rising with greater, disproportionate population pressures.

With great

c) long term?

Quality of life across a range of measures and issues.  A doubling of population (what about 200, or even 300 years?) will see life for locals and our beautiful environment profoundly changed – not for the better.  As a small example Military Road has just been widened into a “mini freeway”: Within ten (10) to fifteen (15) years at current immigration levels, I confidently expect it will need further widening with the currently proposed tunnel(s) at capacity.

Zali Steggall: Independent

Tell us about your connection to the Warringah electorate and name three places in the electorate that you love.

I was born in Manly Hospital, and have lived in Manly, Fairlight, and North Balgowlah. l went to Queenwood in Mosman for high school and was presented the keys to Manly after winning Australia’s first individual Winter Olympics medal in 1998. I have loved raising my kids in Warringah and enjoy being part of the local community. I was a Sea Eagles Angels member for many years and love staying fit and active in our beautiful local environment, from swimming the Bold and Beautiful to running around Manly Dam.

Why are you standing as a candidate in this election? What do you bring to our community?

I’m a local, working mum, family law barrister, and Olympic medallist. I am standing as an independent candidate and am focused on representing the values and concerns of the community, especially real long term action on climate change, bringing down the cost of power by focusing on renewables and storage, improving congestion with the tunnel done right and future proofing our economy by investing in innovation and new technology.  I believe that it is time for a new era in Warringah.

What is your definition of leadership? How will you lead by example and create a positive productive culture to work and operate in, both in your time in Warringah and in Canberra?

Many people are dissatisfied with politics and do not trust their elected representatives. I believe that we need to hold our elected representatives to a higher standard. I am committed to legislation to set a minimum standard of truth in political advertising, a National Independent Commission Against Corruption and a fact check department for Parliament, to ensure fact-based debate.

As an independent, I am committed to representing the concerns and values of Warringah, not hidden party agendas or personal ambitions. I have been focused on running a positive campaign and have been really excited to see the level of support my campaign has received from the community.

If elected, how do you plan to canvass the opinions and concerns of Warringah residents throughout your term, so as to truly represent us in Canberra?

As an Independent, I am not beholden to party lines and ideologies. I am committed to representing the views and values of Warringah.

In order to get the best outcomes for the people of Warringah, I intend to hold quarterly community forums to touch base with the electorate on important issues.  I also intend to encourage an open door policy if residents want to meet with me and raise concerns.

Please rank these issues, in terms of your opinion of their level of importance to Australians today (assign numbers, 1 being the most important):

  1. Climate Change

  2. Wage stagnation and tax cuts

  3. Health funding

  4. Education funding

  5. Housing affordability

  6. The threat of terrorism

There have only been 116 female Australian MPs in the House of Representatives since Federation. How will you work to address this imbalance?

Over several decades we have seen some improvements in measures of gender equity like female representation in workplaces, on corporate boards and in remuneration, but there remains an average 14% gap in pay and women retire with, on average, 40% less superannuation. Unfortunately, female representation in all levels of government is still far from equitable. Whilst the Labor Party has put in place a policy that has substantially increased female representation and participation, female representation in the Liberal and National Parties is at an all-time low.

I believe Parliament and all levels of government, should reflect our community and gender balance. I support quotas being set to ensure equal representation. I look forward to supporting initiatives to encourage more young women into politics.

Where do you stand on NDIS funding, hospital funding and aged care?

Our hospitals must provide safe, high-quality healthcare and be able to meet the community’s growing needs. This means adequate funding and must be a government priority. As part of my overall health policy, I am also committed to working for better funding and accountability for all aged care, as well as funding of the NDIS, which must be funded immediately to ensure the needs of people with disabilities are effectively met.

Is nuclear power a consideration for you or your party?

Nuclear power has been effective as zero-emissions baseload power in several OECD countries. However, in Australia, we lack the local expertise at constructing and operating the plants. Due to the rapid decrease in costs in renewables, solar and wind, nuclear is not an energy solution for Australia as nuclear power plants are very expensive to build and operate.  We can achieve a reliable and secure grid, low power prices and zero emissions, through a combination of renewable energy technologies, pumped hydro and battery storage. Australia is already leading the world on renewable energy uptake and I believe we should continue on this trajectory.

What changes will you support in order to lift vaccination rates to safe community levels for common diseases such measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, etc?

According to the Australian Medical Association, high vaccination levels are essential for the health of our communities as well as the wellbeing and development of our children. It is a troubling trend that there have been increasing challenges in administering vaccines to certain community segments. To overcome this, I will support and work with efforts to improve vaccination rates through not-for-profits and other health organisations, such as the  Sydney North Primary Health Network, whose immunisation program aims to reduce the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases in the community by providing ongoing support to immunisation providers.

What is your position on the West Papua conflict that affects our nearest neighbour?

A cohesive and stable Indonesia is integral to our national security, so it’s important that Indonesia remains conflict-free. However, I understand there have been ongoing tensions between Indonesia and the West Papuan ethnic minority since the 1960s. This is a long-standing and simmering dispute and will be difficult to resolve quickly. I support ongoing diplomatic talks and eventual peaceful resolution to the conflict utilising existing frameworks set out by the United Nation. This resolution must recognise the ethnic and cultural differences of the West Papuans, so as to ensure the best and enduring outcome for those communities.

What is your position on the proposed Western Harbour Tunnel and Beaches Link? If it does not go ahead, what alternative solution to traffic congestion do you suggest?

Traffic congestion has been an issue in Warringah for over 25 years.  As one element of improving congestion, I support the State Government proposed tunnel, final details for which will be known when the Environmental Impact Statement is released in or about mid-2019. I support the tunnel being future proof, with a strong focus on public transport and minimisation of health and environmental impacts.

In addition, I support a strong focus on clean public transport solutions, especially from Dee Why to Chatswood. I look forward to working with all levels of government to improve traffic congestion in Warringah.

What do you see as the biggest issues facing the people of the Warringah electorate in the

a) short term – Increased support for local organisations and develop opportunities for small businesses, especially in innovation and new technology and increase funding and support for local mental health providers.

b) medium-term – Review the Environmental Impact statement (EIS) for tunnel, anticipated to be released in or about mid-2019, and develop a business case for the project to receive Infrastructure Australia funding, work with State Government to minimise environmental and health impacts; support review and tax reform to assist families and parenting costs.

c) long term – Support real long term action on climate change and protect our local environment, establish a reserve bank style independent climate change authority to deliver real long term action on climate change.

Suellen Wrightson: United Australia Party

No answers received as yet.